bandeau-08-2016

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Sessions > FSD8 Fluids/Sediments interactions & Diagenesis

SYMPOSIUM FSD8 - Fluids/Sediments interactions & Diagenesis

Chairs. Valérie CHAVAGNAC (CNRS - GET, FRA), Guilhem HOAREAU (University of Pau, FRA), Benjamin BRIGAUD (University of Paris Sud, FRA), Richard WORDEN (University of Liverpool, GBR) mailto

The objective of this symposium is to bring together studies covering an area ranging from academic approaches to industrial applications to provide an update on our understanding of fluids flow, fluids/sediments interactions and diagenetic processes in carbonate, clastic rocks and their integration in the prediction of fluid circulation, reservoir qualities, or oil / gas / metal accumulation, across spatial and temporal scales.

We invite studies combining various datasets (mineralogy, water and sediment geochemistry, seismic attributes, heat flux, porosity…) and employ a wide range of scientific approaches (natural and man-made environments, km to nano scale observation, temporal variability over short to long timescales, experimental to computational studies, geochemical to geophysical datasets …). This will be an opportunity to discuss, exchange, and debate about new perspectives and challenges in the field combining advanced characterization methods with innovative modelling techniques all applied on modern to fossil environments.

  • FSD8.0 Open Session on Fluids/Sediments interactions & Diagenesis
  • FSD8.1 Seismic-scale fluid / sediment interaction
  • FSD8.2 Thermochemical and bacterial sulphate reduction: processes, products, effects, analysis
  • FSD8.3/CB1.12 Carbonate diagenesis
  • FSD8.4 Clay mineral controls on pore-scale reservoir quality of clastic systems
  • FSD8.5 IODP - Deciphering the composition of sediment porewaters
  • CB1.5/FSD8.6 Microbialites: a multidisciplinary approach for improved understanding of extant and extinct systems
  • SR7.3/FSD8.7/CB1.11 Impact of facies and diagenesis on Hydrocarbon Carbonate Reservoirs quality
  • SR7.4/FSD8.8 Geothermal studies in sedimentary basins with clay minerals and organic indices to characterize present-day geotherms, fluid- and hydrocarbon migration systems

 

 

  • FSD8.0 Open Session on Fluids/Sediments interactions & Diagenesis

Conveners. Valérie CHAVAGNAC (CNRS - GET, FRA), Guilhem HOAREAU (University of Pau, FRA), Benjamin BRIGAUD (University of Paris Sud, FRA), Richard WORDEN (University of Liverpool, GBR) mailto

Description. This open session invites contributions on the general topics related to Fluids/Sediments interactions & Diagenesis. It is an opportunity to present studies that do not fall within research covered by the special sessions FSD8.1 to FSD8.8.

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  • FSD8.1 Seismic-scale fluid/sediment interactions

Conveners. Patrice IMBERT (TOTAL, FRA), Aurélien GAY (University of Montpellier 2, FRA), Rossella CAPOZZI (Università di Bologna, ITA) mailto

Description. One privileged tool for studying fluid circulation in sedimentary basins is seismic reflection, which highlights fluid circulation-related features on scales ranging from a few meters (seep carbonates) to several kilometers (mud volcanoes, injectite complexes) or even covering vast areas of basins, like hydrate-related bottom-simulating reflections or polygonal fault systems.

The session will address these issues through a combination of seismic-oriented presentations highlighting specific fluid-related features or systems, but also outcrop examples of such phenomena in the fossil record, or live examples exposed at the surface or at the seabed. Insight into the processes from analog or numerical modeling of individual objects, as well as basin modeling to replace observations in the frame of basin-scale fluid circulation should also be included. Depending on the response, the session might be split into subsessions.

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  • FSD8.2 Thermochemical and bacterial sulfate reduction: processes, products, effects, analysis

Conveners. Richard WORDEN (Liverpool University, GBR), Chunfang CAI (Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, CHN) mailto

Description. Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) is a diagenetic reaction between sulfate minerals and petroleum at elevated temperature. Bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) is a similar reaction that occurs at lower temperatures at which microbial activity can still occur; BSR can be natural or induced by injection of, for example sulfate-rich seawater into reservoirs during enhanced oil recovery. TSR and BSR lead to the production of toxic, corrosive and environmentally-damaging H2S, and can be of critical importance to the economics of a discovery. If H2S is present in a field to be developed, then the production system needs to be constructed from high grade steel and environmentally-sustainable plans must be in place for the disposal of H2S.

In this session, we invite contributions that include case studies of TSR and BSR, new analytical techniques used to study the process and products of TSR and BSR, experimental studies of TSR and BSR, and modelling approaches used to forward-predict TSR and BSR.

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  • FSD8.3/CB1.12 Carbonate diagenesis

Conveners. Jean-Pierre GIRARD (TOTAL, FRA), Benjamin BRIGAUD (University of Paris-Sud, FRA), Benoît VINCENT (Cambridge Carbonates Ltd, GBR) mailto

Description. This session seeks to address how diagenetic processes are controlling carbonate rock properties and to review the recent analytical methods, new perspectives and challenges in the field of carbonate diagenesis. Key issues/topics are:

  1. Early diagenesis (Eogenesis), often underestimated but always impacting rock properties. What are the relationships between sequence stratigraphy and carbonate diagenesis?
  2. What are the diagenetic processes and chemical properties (pore water type, redox conditions, alkalinity, pH) controlling the development of discontinuities in carbonate rocks?
  3. How early diagenetic processes may impact the petrophysical properties of carbonates and their subsequent evolution through time?
  4. Nature and the spatio-temporal extension of the processes controlling the physical and chemical transformations of sediments/rocks from their deposition up to now: impact on the petrophysical properties. Recent methodological advances applicable to carbonate diagenesis (U-Pb dating, (U/Th)/He, clumped isotopes, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry).

The objective of this session is to bring together specialists coming from academia and industry, encouraging exchanges and integrated works. The aim is also to provide an update on our understanding of diagenetic processes in carbonate rocks and their integration in the prediction of rock properties (reservoir properties, mineral content, ...). All these issues are key to understand the origin and the prediction of economic resources in sedimentary basins (oil & gas, ore deposit, geothermal energy, CO2 and waste storage).

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  • FSD8.4 Clay mineral controls on pore-scale reservoir quality of clastic systems

Conveners. Sanem ACIKALIN (Newcastle University, GBR), Stuart JONES (Durham University, GBR), Susanne GIER (Vienna University, AUT), Philip MILLSTEAD (Centrica Norge, NOR), Joshua GRIFFITHS (Liverpool University, GBR) mailto

Description. Pore-scale reservoir quality of clastic reservoirs is controlled by various factors which can be grouped in to two main categories: (i) depositional and (ii) diagenetic controls. Besides the other depositional attributes, detrital clay mineral content and distribution have an important role on the determination of the original porosity and permeability of clastic sediments. During burial, the original porosity and permeability are typically degraded by compaction and diagenetic processes. Authigenic clay formation and transformation of detrital clay are important processes which determine the resultant pore systems and flow pathways.

This session aims to bring experts together to discuss various aspects of clay minerals ranging from depositional processes, geochemical and thermodynamic properties, fluid-clay mineral interaction, diagenetic pathways and predictability of clay mineral distribution in a reservoir.

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  • FSD8.5 IODP - Deciphering the composition of sediment porewaters

Conveners. Christophe MONNIN (CNRS - GET, FRA), Guilhem HOAREAU (University of Pau, FRA) mailto

Description. The composition of sediment porewaters is the result of physical (transport: advection and diffusion) and chemical (mineral dissolution and precipitation, adsorption) processes. For example, the dissolution of minute quantities of a mineral is difficult to detect from the observation of solid phases but it can be traced through the changes in elemental concentrations. On another hand slow fluid motion through sediments can be revealed by characteristic diffusion-advection concentration profiles of conservative elements in porewaters. The chemical and isotopic analysis of sediment porewaters can thus provide tracers of ongoing processes in modern sediments that can shed light on fossil systems where the fluids have long disappeared.

This session is thus intended to bring together studies focused on the geochemistry of sediment (both continental and marine) porewaters.

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  • CB1.5/FSD8.6 Microbialites: a multidisciplinary approach for improved understanding of extant and extinct systems

Conveners. Daniel ARIZTEGUI (University of Geneva, CHE), Raphaël BOURILLOT (Ensegid-Bordeaux INP, FRA), Anneleen FOUBERT (University of Fribourg, CHE), Emmanuelle VENNIN (University of Bourgogne, FRA), Pieter T. VISSCHER (University of Connecticut, USA) mailto

Description. Microbialites are organosedimentary deposits formed through the mineralization of benthic microbial mats and/or trapping and binding of sedimentary particles. These structures are abundant in modern – sometimes extreme – environments (e.g., hypersaline lakes; hydrothermal sources; caves) and are common in the fossil record, hence constituting an invaluable archive of past Earth’s surface and subsurface evolution. The last two decades have seen an emergence of studies focusing on microbe-mineral interactions and formation of microbial sedimentary fabrics. More recently, early diagenetic processes have also gained research attention. Many advances in methodology, e.g., omics approaches, imaging techniques such as micro-XRF and micro CT scans, have allowed a better understanding of microbialite formation from initial development to evolution during early and late diagenesis. The understanding of preservation modalities of modern microbial mats allows for a better interpretation of the fossil record.

This transdisciplinary session combines research on fossil and modern microbialites with a broad focus such as sedimentology, (bio)geochemistry, microbiology, molecular biology, geomicrobiology, and mineralogy.

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  • SR7.3/FSD8.7/ CB1.11 Impact of facies anddiagenesis on Hydrocarbon Carbonate Reservoirs quality

Conveners. Raffaele DI CUIA (GEPlan Consulting, ITA), Renaud TOULLEC (UniLaSalle, FRA), Alberto RIVA (GEPlan Consulting & Univ Ferrara, ITA), Youri HAMON (IFP Energies Nouvelles, FRA) mailto

Description. In the last decades, multi-disciplinary studies at the boundary between petroleum industry and academics focused on theimprovement of both reserves estimation and the “Yet to Find” in the inherently heterogeneous carbonate porous media classically associated with low recovery factor (10 to 30%). The quality of carbonate reservoirs is strongly influenced by the original depositional facies and their later paragenetic evolution and burial history. To understand the complex distribution of reservoir properties and the impact on the hydrocarbon potentials of carbonate sequences it is fundamental to correctly asses the initial depositional setting and it lateral and spatial variability but also the impact of the burial and later diagenetic fluids circulating within the carbonate sequence.

This section aims at attracting presentations of studies that focus on the characterization of carbonate depositional systems, on the paragenetic evolution of carbonate sequences, on the petrophysical characterization of carbonate rocks and reservoirs and on new approaches to the modeling of carbonate sequences and reservoirs.

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  • SR7.4/FSD8.8 Geothermal studies in sedimentary basins with clay minerals and organic indices to characterize present-day geotherms, fluid- and hydrocarbon migration systems

Conveners. Sébastien POTEL (UniLaSalle Beauvais, FRA), Isabel SUÁREZ-RUIZ (INCAR-CSIC, ESP), Rafael FERREIRO MÄLHMANN (Technische Universität Darmstadt, DEU), Simon LOPEZ (BRGM, FRA), Andrea MOSCARIELLO (University of Geneva, CHE) mailto

Description. The sedimentary basins can be the origin of different energy sources: oil, gas, geothermal; and therefore, a subject of major interest.

  1. Basins are filled with sedimentary rocks and formed in different geodynamic settings. In this context, geothermal studies involving clay mineralogy and organic indices are of great importance to characterize pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions involved in the formation and evolution of sedimentary basins. As they involve rock-water interaction, dissolution and precipitation and transfers of mass and energy (e.g. hydrocarbon migration, thermal up-flows) fluids dynamics are also of interest.
  2. Then, the reconstruction of the subsidence and tectonic history combined with the dynamic study of fluids is crucial for basin modelling. Moreover, these studies are also significant for evaluating the potential sources of hydrocarbons and/or geothermal resources.
  3. The characterization of P-T fields of a basin, the correlations between clay indices, organic parameters, index minerals (Barrow zones), facies critical paragenesis (facies zones of Winkler), fluid inclusion P-T determinations and clay mineral isotopic studies are necessary to understand different geodynamic settings.

All these investigations are dedicated to gain insights into the geodynamic evolution of low-grade metamorphic terranes. Geodynamics, advective heat flow or hydrothermal convective heat transfer have an important control on all applied geothermal indices. Finally, the present-day thermal equilibrium of the basins and the distribution of potential geothermal and hydrocarbon resources may be the result of this complex evolution history and later re-distribution of heat. The session is intended to consolidate the progress in these types of studies.

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